Tag Archives: Grand Designs

Reflections

Since Christmas, I’ve been undergoing a small experiment. It started with an inspiration from author and shaman Caitlin Matthews and resulted in twelve days of reflections, which can be taken as oracles for the year ahead. Seeking a simple way to publish, I chose Instagram and each day added a photograph which I felt added to the experience. After the experiment, I have continued to post the odd reflection, basing them on daily events, inspiration from others, meditations and time in nature. Here’s my ‘forecast’ for March 2018, in case you’d like to come along for the journey!

#twelvedaysofchristmas Day 3 – 28th December – Forecast for #March2018 I'm feeling lazy today. When consciousness knocks, I keep my eyes firmly closed, not yet ready to start moving. I want to stay warm, cozy and quiet. Dreams turn into meditations as I deliberately keep my mind from wandering too far away. When I finally agree to let the light in, I see this tree outside my window, already illuminated with sun. The new birdhouse sits waiting while potential occupants flutter about, tasting the treats left out for them. How does Nature greet a new day? With gentle acceptance. In rain or shine, bluster or stillness, the tree and the birds just get on with it. Perhaps March 2018 will require some quiet determination. Some firm resolve. But then also, March is the month when a soothsayer warned Caesar to stay home and when he didn’t, there was trouble! (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ides_of_March ) Sometimes, there might be wisdom in staying still. Sometimes we do need that extra hour of feeling safe in our bed, if we're lucky enough to have a safe bed. #twentyeighteen #forecast #divination #timeoutoftime #signsandwonders #idesofmarch #meditation #mindfulness

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By the way, for those of you asking about Simon and Jasmine Dale, who lost their amazing eco-home on New Year’s day to fire, over 1100 people have donated to their crowdfund, raising £35,000 so far. The family have expressed their thanks and gratitude for all the support and are taking some time out to dream up the next stage of their lives.

 

Day 9 – 3rd January #September #twelvedaysofchristmas Diving deeper into yesterday’s thoughts about #failure, I came across a TED talk by #brenébrown a researcher/storyteller from the US who speaks about #vulnerability being the doorway to #creativity of any kind. To be vulnerable takes #courage, which Brené defines as having its root in the Latin word for #heart. She describes those who are most able to be vulnerable as #wholehearted. Which leads me to a story about two of the most wholehearted people I know, whose #handbuilt #lowimpact #natural #home in #wales, which took more then 5 years to build, has just burnt to the ground. How does a person find the #resilience to come back from that? Maybe, to respond heartully to the whole of #life, all we can hope to do is remain open to the ultimate vulnerability, #death. In the words of US poet laureate Tracy K Smith: “Whether it will bend down to greet us like a father, Or swallow us like a furnace. I'm ready To meet what refuses to let us keep anything For long. What teases us with blessings, Bends us with grief. Wizard, thief, the great Wind rushing to knock our mirrors to the floor, To sweep our short lives clean.” In September, can I be ready to surrender all I have worked for in order to be open to the whole of life? #twentyeighteen #oracle #forecast #divination #timeoutoftime #signsandwonders #meditation #mindfulness #nature #vulnerability #death #life #surrender

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The Nature of Cities

This afternoon I had a filming appointment at a food forest garden nearby. To get there would take a half hour walk or ten minute cycle. It was raining. Hard. I was a bit worried about slipping off my bike and smashing my camera, but by the time I’d finished faffing – looking up directions; making a note of the organiser’s number – it was a bit late to walk.

I rode slowly and carefully, avoiding puddles and tram lines. I got there in plenty of time and as I arrived, I realised I was smiling. My inner mantra had changed from “Oh, it’s raining again” to “I’m so happy” and it only took a moment to work out why. I loved being in the rain.

The food garden was lush and fruitful, with lovingly tended plots abundant with beans, herbs and salads. Since moving to the city, I’ve become a big fan of urban agriculture and I heard that Kevin McCloud, of Grand Designs fame, was recently advocating turning Melbourne’s parks into food gardens. That would be great! Yarra Council is really forward thinking in that respect and has appointed an urban agriculture officer. He’s been responsible for putting planter boxes all around the neighbourhood so that we see herbs and veggies growing on many street corners. Today, the garden shone and twinkled with raindrops. You could almost hear the plants inhaling the fresh moist air.

Only this morning, I was thinking how Nature was enjoyable in any weather. Sunshine is great, obviously, but the beach in winter is wild and when the waves crash the shore, some primal energy is released not only in them, but in me. City life is short on primal energy and I often find myself flatlining in a dullness of being. When you’re used to being stirred by Nature, a caffe latte in a funky cafe and an illicit freewheel through the park at night can only take you so far. Mostly, I find it’s not far enough.

When I got back from my bicycle shower, I went out again. Just for fun. I don’t own an umbrella and I left my hat at home. I wanted to feel the rain on my face, the wind in my hair. I bounced up the street, focused only on the feel of Nature washing me down. My stupid grin could have been mistaken for love, or madness. I just felt so relieved to have found a way to be in Nature, even here, in the depths of the city. Melbourne is known for its “four seasons in a day” but usually, it’s a bit of a pain. Early in our stay here, a friend showed me the contents of her oversized handbag. She routinely carried both leggings and an umbrella, however the day began. “It can change at any time!” she warned.

I wandered up to the post office to send a leisurely letter, strolling lightly as people hurried by, heads down against the weather. I smiled and smiled to myself.
On the way back, I looked up to see a line of pigeons perched on a telegraph wire. They were mostly hunched, like the pedestrians. Heads tucked into their necks, feathers ruffled and damp. The wire hung over the middle of the street. Could they not have chosen a more sheltered spot to huddle? Thirty-one, I counted. Why that wire? And why was there only one single pigeon on the wire next door?

I spent a contented time, in the rain, watching the pigeons and realised that in one lucky afternoon, I had discovered that the city weather could allow me to immerse in Nature and city animals were also wildlife worth watching.

Have you got any tips for city survival?

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